VASCAM Exhibition ǀ NATURE AND US

Triển lãm tranh tại San Jose, California
VASCAM Exhibition ǀ  NATURE AND US
Vinh danh họa sĩ Ann Phong và Trinh Mai

SJ Exhibition brochure cover 1

Nếu ai hỏi bạn: “Văn hóa Việt Nam có gì?” thì bạn sẽ trả lời ra sao?

Chúng ta ai cũng biết văn hóa truyền thống Việt Nam, với ca trù, hát chèo, cải lương, Hồ Xuân Hương, Nguyễn Trãi, hát quan họ, hội Lim, tranh Đông Hồ, v.v. Nhưng hãy tạm thời quên văn hóa truyền thống, bây giờ là thế kỷ 21, người Việt Nam sáng tạo những gì? Continue reading

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Sending your kids to the US for school? Stories from the ‘kids’ (part 3 of 3)

sequoia national park - © Anvi Hoàng

sequoia national park – © Anvi Hoàng

—– Đọc bài tiếng Việt —–

To balance out the story I have been presenting you, I am ending this series with the voices of the used-to-be ‘kids’ who came here to the US for school. Read their stories to find out what is happening to them right now or could be waiting for them at the end of this educational journey. The original responses were in English, unless noted otherwise. Continue reading

Sending your kids to the US for school? Team Nina Nhung Hoang and Glen Tatum’s tips for Vietnamese parents (part 2 of 3)

© Anvi Hoàng

© Anvi Hoàng

—– Đọc bài tiếng Việt —–

Nina Nhung Hoang (no relation to me) and her husband, Glen Tatum, have more than ten years of experience in hosting Vietnamese students at their home. In part 2 of this series, the focus is on details of everyday life the Vietnamese students experience in their home: daily schedule from the time everybody is up to the time they go to bed, their weekend and holiday activities, the kid’s daily or weekly chores to keep their room and the house clean, etc. Among these things, discipline is essential. And Nina and Glen are good with that because both of them used to be teachers. Nina was teaching for ten years in Vietnam before coming to the US and Glen with more than ten years of college teaching experience before changing his job. Glen is responsible for imparting American culture to the kids, and Nina holding down the Vietnamese side. Nina’s motto is to keep the good things from Vietnamese culture and learn the positive things from American culture.

Continue reading

Sending your kids to the US for school? Check out Nina Nhung Hoang’s tips for Vietnamese parents (part 1 of 3)

picture2005 205

—– Đọc bài tiếng Việt —–

As of 2015, Vietnam is the fastest growing market, in terms of percentage, of international students coming to the US for studying. To be more precise, World Education News and Reviews (WENR) predicted that Vietnam is one of top four emerging markets to watch in the next three years, through 2018, when it comes to international student recruitment for America. Yes, you heard it right. Continue reading

A Vietnamese Requiem: What and Why

Photo by Anvi Hoàng

Photo by Anvi Hoàng

—– Đọc bài tiếng Việt —–

Requiem is a large scale musical composition typically lasting from about thirty minutes to over an hour. In Western music history requiem is the most important musical genre used to honor, to celebrate or mourn a death or deaths of many people in the public. This genre typically utilizes a certain Christian liturgical text and an instrumental force. A requiem is designed to be performed on stage, meant to be celebratory in tone or preaching about the significance of the Judgment Day, and open to the public in a concert event.

In Vietnam, the musical tradition that deals with death is considered a family affair. Continue reading

Memory in a Pearl

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© Galatea: Jewelry by Artist.

 —– Đọc bài tiếng Việt —–

We live in an era where discoveries and inventions are everyday happenings and we take them for granted, maybe, especially in the high tech industry. When was the last time you held the latest version of a tablet or a smart phone in your hands and was touched by the remarkable efforts put into it? I meant really touched in your heart it made you want to cry to look at the object! Think about the last time your heart felt tinkled at receiving a gift of any kind! When was it? I wonder whether the normalcy of frequent appearance of new toys and tools made available by high tech that makes life too preoccupied or predictable in some way for us to appreciate its many gifts any more. Continue reading

ĐẠI PHAN WRITING CONTEST: $1,000 PRIZE

A competition for EVERYONE writing in either English or Vietnamese!VCI logo horizontal

Call for Essays

Deadline: March 15, 2015

DESCRIPTION

In an effort to promote more awareness of Vietnamese cultural identity, diaCRITICS is now hosting an annual prize for the purpose. Via this contest, diaCRITICS also aims to build an archive of essays on Vietnamese cultural identity from which readers everywhere can benefit.

In light of this, the call seeks essays that fall into the following four categories: literature, visual arts, architecture, and music. Essayists can write about one or more of these categories. “Vietnamese cultural identity” can be discussed in relation to the Vietnamese in Vietnam, overseas, or both.

PRIZE

The jury will select one winning essay, whose author will receive a prize of $1,000. The selected winner will also be published on diaCRITICS website in both English and Vietnamese. We reserve the right to publish some selected essays, including the winner, on diaCRITICS website in both English and Vietnamese.

We reserve the right not to give a prize if no essay meets the jury’s standards.

ELIGIBILITY

Everyone, with no limitation on age or nationality.

Submitted essay must be originally written in either English or Vietnamese. Essays previously published elsewhere within a year from the deadline are acceptable as well. The winning essay will be translated into English or Vietnamese.

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

Word count: 2,000–3,000 words.

Submissions must be emailed as letter-sized PDFs together with a cover page (download from diacritics.org). The applicant’s name must not appear anywhere on the submission.

The applicant’s name and contact information, including the email address by which they subscribe to diaCRITICS, must appear on the cover page ONLY. Essays will be read anonymously by the jury.

Email submissions to daiphanprize@gmail.com with “Dai Phan Prize” as the subject line.

Submissions must be received by 5:00pm EDT on Sunday, March 15th, 2015. Late submissions will not be accepted. The winner will be announced at the end of May.

Questions about this call for essays can be sent to daiphanprize@gmail.com.

–> Đọc bài tiếng Việt

MEMORIES OF VIETNAM – Call for Essays

ky niem VN

—– Đọc bài tiếng Việt —–

The Viễn Đông Daily News, with financial support from Vietnamese culture advocates Anvi and Friends, is pleased to announce the first annual call for essays with a topic on Memories about Vietnam (Kỷ Niệm Việt Nam).

We recognize that it is crucial for the older generation to retain, share, and pass on their precious memories about Vietnam to the younger generation. It is a duty and responsibility that many people, especially Vietnamese descents in the diaspora, find difficult to carry out in the face of mounting challenges of everyday life. In an effort to help them make it happen, we offer them the tool most of them are familiar with, even love dearly, Vietnamese language. This call aims at encouraging the older generation of Vietnamese to record their unique memories of Vietnam in writing, in Vietnamese, and leave them for the younger generations. This action will help to create a deeper sense of cultural root and belonging for us all in the community, thus establishing an essence of Vietnamese culture that we can share.

The call will be sent out several times a year. The first deadline is at 5PM, EST, Thursday, January 15, 2015. We receive essays today.

Eligibility: any Vietnamese or Vietnamese descent who is 50 or older

Language of the essay: Vietnamese

Length: 1,000 words (two pages) to 2,000 words

Honorarium: the chosen essay for each call will receive an honorarium of $500.00

Publication: the chosen essay will be published on the Viễn Đông Daily News

Submission: email your typed essay with contact information (name, age, email address) to: kyniemvietnam@gmail.com, or mail you writing with contact information (name, age, home address) to Viễn Đông Daily News, 14891 Moran Street, Westminster, CA 92683-5599.

If you have any question, please email us at kyniemvietnam@gmail.com.

One road: 5: Fight the cultural war.

Fighting China Inside and Out

Cảnh thăng hoa - The finale scene. Photo: Anvi Hoàng.

The finale scene in the opera The Tale of Lady Thị Kính. Photo: Anvi Hoàng.

—– Đọc bài tiếng Việt —– 

Vietnam is a small country next to China. That is one reason it is still bullied by China in the games that it plays with its two other counterparts, America and Russia. Frustrating. Mad. Raged. I would not indulge in these emotions. Whether the war between China and Vietnam escalates or not, whether world war III would be in sight or not, and no matter who loses and wins, my commitment is to a stronger and more prosperous Vietnam, a situation that is made possible by Vietnamese in the homeland essentially, unfortunately for me. As someone who already left the country, I am limited to not endorsing nonconstructive criticism of Vietnam, at the same time consciously serve as a Vietnam advocate who provides factual information about Vietnam and its culture for non-Vietnamese. This way, I have chosen one road to walk on. For myself and for the vindication of my soul: I chose the cultural battle. Continue reading

One road: 1-4: Be proud and boycott.

Fighting China Inside and Out

Tranh kỹ thuật số của Hoàng Ngọc Biên - Digital artwork by Hoàng Ngọc Biên.

Tranh kỹ thuật số của Hoàng Ngọc Biên – Digital artwork by Hoàng Ngọc Biên.

—– Đọc bài tiếng Việt —– 

Without pride to anchor in life, we are lost.

Vietnam is a small country next to China. That is one reason it is still bullied by China in the games that China plays with its two other counterparts, America and Russia. Frustrating. Mad. Raged. I would not indulge in these emotions. Whether the war between China and Vietnam escalates or not, whether World War III would be in sight or not, and no matter who loses and wins, my commitment is to a long-term goal of building a stronger and more prosperous Vietnam, a situation that is made possible by Vietnamese in the homeland essentially, unfortunately for me. As someone who already left the country, I am limited to not endorsing nonconstructive criticism of Vietnam, at the same time consciously serve as a Vietnam advocate who provides factual information about Vietnam and its culture for non-Vietnamese. This way, I have chosen one road to walk on. For myself and for the vindication of my soul: I chose the cultural battle. Continue reading